Vaccine, Treatment and Testing Options for COVID-19, Flu and RSV (2024)

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Vaccine, Treatment and Testing Options for COVID-19, Flu and RSV

If at anytime you experience severe symptoms, please call 911 or head to your nearest emergency room. If you're covered by an employer group or individual and family plan market, view the information below on where you can receive your vaccinations for the flu, COVID-19 and RSV, along with testing and treatment options.

Updated as of July 3, 2024

COVID-19

The Flu

RSV

Where can I receive a vaccine?
  • Your Primary Care Provider
  • If available, at a GHC-SCW vaccine clinic
  • Costco
  • Your Primary Care Provider
  • At a GHC-SCW vaccine clinic
  • Costco
  • Your GHC-SCW Primary Care Provider
Is my vaccine covered through GHC-SCW?
  • Yes
  • Yes
GHC-SCW is currently offering coverage through the following plans:
  • GHC-SCW Small Group, Large Group and Individual and Family Plans
    • Infant RSV: Covered
    • Maternal RSV: Covered
    • Ages 60 and Older: Not Covered
  • FEHB
    • Infant RSV: Covered
    • Material RSV: Covered
    • Ages 60 and Older: Not Covered
I’m an employer who would like to have an on-site vaccine clinic for my employees at my place of work. How can I schedule an on-site vaccine clinic for my employees?If you would like to schedule an on-site COVID-19 vaccine clinic at your place of work, please contact*:
  • VaxPro
    Jay Plavnick
    jay@vaxpro.com
    (262) 241-4522

*Please note, a guaranteed minimum of 25 shots is required for each scheduled on-site vaccine clinic. Not all 25+ shots need to be for employees with GHC-SCW insurance. VaxPro can bill other health plans. For further clarification, please inquire with VaxPro

If you would like to schedule an on-site flu vaccine clinic at your place of work, please contact*:
  • VaxPro
    Jay Plavnick
    jay@vaxpro.com
    (262) 241-4522

*Please note, a guaranteed minimum of 25 shots is required for each scheduled on-site vaccine clinic. Not all 25+ shots need to be for employees with GHC-SCW insurance. VaxPro can bill other health plans. For further clarification, please inquire with VaxPro

N/A
What are my testing options?
  • At Home Test
  • Community Site (like Public Health Madison & Dane County)
  • At a primary care clinic, only if your symptoms meet criteria for an appointment or you have a high risk condition.
Flu testing is not needed for most patients. You may be diagnosed based on your symptoms. When supplies are limited, testing is reserved for patients with significant symptoms or high risk conditions.RSV testing is not needed for most patients. You may be diagnosed based on your symptoms. Testing is reserved for infants with significant symptoms or those with high risk conditions.
Is a positive test required for treatment?YesNoThere isn’t specific treatment for RSV.
What are my treatment options?Usually Paxlovid
  • Can be prescribed by your clinic or DHS Wisconsin.
  • It does not cure COVID-19 infection but can lower the chance of hospitalization.
Usually Tamiflu
  • Can usually be prescribed over the phone.
  • When supplies are limited, Tamiflu is reserved for patients with significant symptoms or high-risk conditions.
  • Tamiflu may help lessen your symptoms if started in the first 48 hours of illness.
  • Can sometimes cause stomach side effects.
  • Does not cure the flu but can lower the chance of hospitalization.
Home Treatment
  • Fever reducing medicines can help during fever.
  • Make sure to stay hydrated and drink plenty of fluids.
  • Monitor your symptoms for worsening.
How do providers decide what treatment to recommend?Your provider or nurse will decide to prescribe Paxlovid if you’re an adult with a positive COVID-19 test who is at risk for severe illness.Your provider or nurse will decide to prescribe Tamiflu after evaluating your risk and symptoms.Your provider or nurse will give advice and ideas on how to manage your symptoms at home.
I have a known exposure, but I’m asymptomatic. What should I do?
  • Monitor for symptoms.
  • Wear a mask.
  • Take a at-home test after 5 days or when symptoms start.
Monitor your symptoms.Monitor your symptoms.
I have mild symptoms but I’m not high risk. What should I do?
  • Take an at-home test.
  • Treat symptoms as needed, get plenty of rest, and drink lots of fluids.
  • Social distance.
  • Wear a mask around others.
  • Stay home.
  • Monitor symptoms.
  • Treat symptoms as needed, get plenty of rest, and drink lots of fluids.
  • Social distance.
  • Wear a mask around others.
  • Monitor your symptoms.
  • Treat symptoms as needed, get plenty of rest, and drink lots of fluids.
  • Social distance.
  • Wear a mask around others if you are older than 3 years old.
  • Monitor your symptoms.
I have mild symptoms but I’m high risk. What should I do?
  • If your at-home test is positive, ask your provider or Wisconsin DHS about a prescription for Paxlovid.
  • Call your clinic if your symptoms worsen.
  • Contact your clinic about Tamiflu if you are within 48 hours of the start of your symptoms.
  • Call your clinic if your symptoms worsen.
Call your clinic if your symptoms worsen.
I have moderate symptoms but I’m not high risk. What should I do?
  • Take an at-home test.
  • Stay home.
  • Contact your clinic or follow up with your care team as needed through a Video Visit with GHCMyChartSM.
  • Treat symptoms as needed.
  • Stay home.
  • Contact your clinic or follow up with your care team as needed through a Video Visit with GHCMyChartSM.
  • Treat symptoms as needed.
  • Stay home.
  • Contact your clinic or follow up with your care team as needed through a Video Visit with GHCMyChartSM.
I have moderate symptoms and I’m high risk. What should I do?
  • Same as above AND also ask your provider or DHS about Paxlovid.
  • Contact your clinic or follow up with your care team as needed through a Video Visit with GHCMyChartSM.
  • Same as above AND also ask your provider or DHS about Tamiflu.
  • Contact your clinic or follow up with your care team as needed through a Video Visit with GHCMyChartSM.
  • Treat symptoms as needed.
  • Contact your clinic or follow up with your care team as needed through a Video Visit with GHCMyChartSM.

Quick Tips If You're Feeling Unwell and Have a Negative COVID Test

  • Stay home at much as possible to prevent spreading germs. This is especially important if you’re around people who are more likely to get sick. If you need to be around others, consider wearing a high-quality mask.
  • Get plenty of rest. Make sure you are taking time to rest so that your body can recover. Remember to also drink plenty of water to stay hydrated.
  • If you feel worse, contact your primary care provider. Your primary care provider will help you figure out why you’re feeling unwell and recommend the right treatments to feel better.
    • If you’re sick with the flu, your doctor may prescribe an antiviral drug to help make your illness less severe and shorter.
    • If you have RSV, the treatment may depend on how old you are. Babies and older adults are most likely to get very sick from this illness. Your primary care provider may prescribe an antibody therapy recently approved by the FDA for infants younger than 8 months old.
    • If you have a cold, you should rest, drink fluids and take over-the-counter medicine.
Vaccine, Treatment and Testing Options for COVID-19, Flu and RSV (2024)

FAQs

What is the combined test for COVID-19 flu and RSV? ›

The COVID-19/RSV/Influenza A&B Antigen Test Kit is a lateral flow immunoassay for the qualitative detection of SARS-CoV-2, respiratory syncytial, influenza A and influenza B viral nucleoprotein antigens in nasal swabs from subjects.

Are there tests for RSV and flu? ›

Test for COVID-19, flu and RSV—with one swab

We offer the only at-home collection kit that tests for COVID-19, flu and RSV with a single swab.

Can you test for COVID and RSV at the same time? ›

How do I determine if I have COVID-19 or the flu? Since the symptoms are so similar, the best way to accurately determine whether you have COVID-19 or the flu is to get tested. The COVID-19, Flu, RSV combined test is an option if you would like to determine what type of infection you have.

What are the options for RSV vaccine? ›

There are two options for protection of infants against RSV: maternal vaccine for the pregnant person and preventive antibodies given to the baby. Only one of these options is needed for most babies to be protected.

What is the combination Covid RSV flu test? ›

TouchBio RSV, FLU A/B & Covid-19 Rapid Antigen Combo Test (Nasal) is an immunochromatographic membrane assay and contains 3 independent tests, the SARS-CoV-2 antigen test, FLU A/B antigen test and RSV antigen test.

What is the difference between RSV PCR and rapid testing? ›

RSV antigens trigger your immune system to attack the virus. Rapid antigen tests can provide results in an hour or less. Molecular tests called RT-PCR (polymerase chain reaction) tests look for genetic material from the RSV virus in your sample. These tests can find smaller amounts of the virus than antigen tests.

What is the treatment for RSV? ›

Possible RSV Treatments When Hospitalized

The hospital will use intravenous (IV) fluids to aid in hydration, and a breathing machine or humidified oxygen to help your body receive the oxygen it needs. In most cases, hospitalization will only last a few days.

How do I know if I have flu Covid or RSV? ›

COVID-19 is different from flu or RSV in that it can appear in different forms. "While we see many of the same symptoms such as cough, fatigue, and headache, COVID-19 may also present with nausea or vomiting, diarrhea, or sudden loss of taste and/or smell.

What does RSV feel like in adults? ›

RSV usually begins with mild cold-like symptoms such as a runny nose, sore throat, cough and headache. Emergency symptoms include shortness of breath, high fever, bluish tint to your skin, wheezing and worsening cough.

What is it called when you have the flu and COVID at the same time? ›

Flurona” is simply a term used to describe what happens when a person contracts influenza and COVID-19 at the same time. As influenza and SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, are both respiratory viruses, infection with one actually increases susceptibility to the other.

Can the flu turn into RSV? ›

Respiratory viruses are common in children under 5, particularly those who attend daycare or are exposed to tobacco smoke. Most cases are mild, but for some children, an ordinary cold or flu can quickly turn into respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).

Which drug is the only approved treatment for RSV? ›

Currently, the only FDA-approved drug for the treatment of active RSV infection is ribavirin. This medication is used only for people hospitalized with severe lower respiratory RSV infections.

Who should not get the RSV vaccine? ›

If you have ever been allergic to any of the ingredients in the RSV vaccine, you should not get the RSV shot. If you are currently sick (whether or not you have a fever), you should wait to get the RSV shot until you are feeling better.

Is RSV recommended for seniors? ›

CDC recommends all adults ages 75 and older get an RSV vaccine. CDC recommends RSV vaccines for all adults ages 60-74 who are at increased risk of severe RSV disease.

What is the dual test for COVID-19 and the flu? ›

A rapid test for the qualitative detection of SARS-CoV-2 Nucleocapsid Protein, Influenza A and Influenza B nucleoproteins antigens present in nasal swab specimen. For self-testing in vitro diagnostic use only.

What are the CDC influenza diagnostic tests? ›

These tests include reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), viral culture, and immunofluorescence assays. All of these tests require that a health care provider swipe the inside of your nose or the back of your throat with a swab and then send the swab for testing.

What is the name of the coinfection between COVID-19 and influenza? ›

Flurona” is a term coined in late 2020 by the Israeli Outbreak Management Advisory Team to describe the potential for contracting the flu and COVID-19 simultaneously.

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